The experiences of individuals with schizophrenia using the Model of Occupational Self-Efficacy in enhancing work skills and returning to work in the open labour market in Western Cape, South Africa.

Iesrafeel Abbas, Mogammad Shaheed Soeker

Abstract


Introduction: Evidence suggests that supported employment strategies improve the rates of employment for individuals with
schizophrenia. The Model of Occupational Self-Efficacy (MOOSE) is such a strategy aimed at enhancing work skills and facilitating
return to work (RTW). The aim of the current study was to explore the experiences of individuals with schizophrenia about the use of
the MOOSE in enhancing work skills and facilitating RTW in the open labour market.
Method: A qualitative research project with an interpretivist paradigm explored the experiences and perceptions of nine participants
diagnosed with Schizophrenia. Two occupational therapists participated as key informants. Data were collected by means of semistructured
interviews and analysed using inductive thematic analysis.
Results: Barriers and facilitators to the use of the MOOSE were revealed. More importantly, the MOOSE enhanced the development
of worker identities and contributed to the successful adaptation of worker roles in the RTW process of individuals with schizophrenia
in the open labour market.
Conclusion: The MOOSE is an effective supported employment strategy for persons with schizophrenia. Factors such as client-centred
practice, the presence of social support, and ongoing therapeutic support contributed to the participants’ successful RTW experienceIntroduction: Evidence suggests that supported employment strategies improve the rates of employment for individuals with schizophrenia.   

Key words: Schizophrenia, supported employment strategies, Model of Occupational Self-Efficacy, return to work, perception,
experience


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ISSN 0038-2337 (print), ISSN 2310-3833 (online)

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